LoL Learning Hub at the Powerhouse Museum

Schools Run a League of Legends Learning Hub at the Powerhouse Museum

February 23rd, 2018|

Back in November 2017, Liverpool Boys High School and Kirrawee High School joined forces to run a League of Legends learning hub for high school students. The event was run at the Powerhouse Museum, NSW – an official NESA endorsed provider of teacher professional development – and came as one of many educational programs offered by The Museum of Applied Arts and Science (MAAS).

Students from eight different schools competed alongside and against each other in games of League of Legends – some experienced, others brand new to the game – followed by a workshop teaching productive online behaviour through the lens of sportsmanship and LoL.

When asked why they decided to run the event at the Powerhouse Museum, Charles Rushworth, Big History (B.H.P) Teacher from Liverpool Boys High School, spoke of the potential learning benefits he sees in gaming.

“Most students game. It makes them want to learn, it’s relevant to their world,” says Rushworth. “They benefit from the lessons that can be learnt through this medium: responsible online behaviour, collaboration, resilience – all the things that come from playing games.”

“…they benefit from the lessons that can be learnt through this medium: responsible online behaviour, collaboration, resilience – all the things that come from playing games.”

Thanks to these two schools, the event is now available to all NSW schools, and Rushworth sees value in learning days like this becoming the norm.

“Giving students the chance to compete against each other in a stadium environment will encourage collaboration between schools, teach students about responsible online behaviour and develop their problem solving skills,” he says. “All of which contributes to them becoming well rounded responsible global citizens.”

Meeting Student Interest

Rushworth himself isn’t a League of Legends player, but the idea for the workshop came about after he observed his students’ enthusiasm for their League of Legends club.

“I first started it because the students came to me, they needed an adult to facilitate the club,” says Rushworth. “I find it very rewarding. Seeing these kids, their passion, and how they want to incorporate it and promote it within the school is something you don’t often see.”

“I find it very rewarding; seeing these kids, their passion, and how they want to incorporate it and promote it within the school is something you don’t often see.”

While the event was led by both Rushworth and Scott Cox of Kirrawee, the workshop itself was run by the Powerhouse Museum, with Ivan Davies of the High School League of Legends Clubs initiative featuring as a guest speaker. The workshop encouraged students to reflect on their games and draw lessons from their interactions. It included a mix of group discussion, physical activity and group iteration, using workshop materials (now available on our Resources page) that align with the Australian and New Zealand national curriculums.

A Different Kind of Learning

After the event, both Rushworth and Cox were delighted with how the event panned out.

“It was definitely worthwhile. Students got to meet students from other schools and experience things they don’t often get to in the classroom. It’s interactive, they get to play games, they get to collaborate with each other and do it in a way that’s engaging.”

“Students got to meet students from other schools and experience things they don’t often get to in the classroom. It’s interactive, they get to play games, they get to collaborate with each other and do it in a way that’s engaging.”

If your students are interested in competing and learning through League of Legends, sessions for the Powerhouse Museum’s League of Legends Learning Hub can be booked through the museum’s website.